Law Insider India

Legal News, Current Trends and Legal Insight | Supreme Court of India and High Courts

[Landmark Judgement] Natasha Singh v/s CBI (2013)

2 min read
Landmark Judgment Law Insider (1)

Published on: 28 November 2022 at 09:29 IST

Court – Supreme Court of India

Citation – Natasha Singh v/s CBI (2013) 5 SCC 741

Hon’ble Supreme Court of India has held that Section 311 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 empowers the court to summon a material witness, or to examine a person present at “any stage” of “any enquiry”, or “trial”, or “any other proceedings” under CrPC, or to summon any person as a witness, or to recall and re-examine any person who has already been examined if his evidence appears to it, to be essential to the arrival of a just decision of the case.

It is held that Section 311 CrPC provides discretionary power and can be exercised even in suo motu if no such application has been filed by either of the parties.

Para – 15

The scope and object of the provision is to enable the court to determine the truth and to render a just decision after discovering all relevant facts and obtaining proper proof of such facts, to arrive at a just decision of the case. Power must be exercised judiciously and not capriciously or arbitrarily, as any improper or capricious exercise of such power may lead to undesirable results.

An application under Section 311 CrPC must not be allowed only to fill up a lacuna in the case of the prosecution, or of the defence, or to the disadvantage of the accused, or to cause serious prejudice to the defence of the accused, or to give an unfair advantage to the opposite party. Further, the additional evidence must not be received as a disguise for retrial, or to change the nature of the case against either of the parties.

Such a power must be exercised, provided that the evidence that is likely to be tendered by a witness, is germane to the issue involved. An opportunity of rebuttal however, must be given to the other party. The power conferred under Section 311 CrPC must therefore, be invoked by the court only in order to meet the ends of justice, for strong and valid reasons, and the same must be exercised with great caution and circumspection.

The very use of words such as “any court”, “at any stage”, or “or any enquiry, trial or other proceedings”, “any person” and “any such person” clearly spells out that the provisions of this section have been expressed in the widest possible terms, and do not limit the discretion of the court in any way.

Thus no escape if the fresh evidence to be obtained is essential to the just decision of the case. The determinative factor should therefore be, whether the summoning/recalling of the said witness is in fact, essential to the just decision of the case.

Drafted By Abhijit Mishra

Key Words: Summon, Discretionary Power, Evidence, Trial.